Sunday, November 9, 2008

Hammer Time: My Secret Shame

Okay, I officially am loving the secret shame thing on Sundays, and so I am adding it as a regular feature.  This week's secret shame came to me as I was thinking about fashion mistakes of the past.  We all have some buried photos of us wearing shit, that we should have known was wrong at the time.  We look back and say to ourselves dear lord what was I thinking.  I don't have a picture of them to show you, but trust me when I swear to it that I once owned and proudly wore fire engine red.....

That is right, like a fool I walked proudly down the street in a pair of rayon MC Hammer pants similar to the ones in this video thinking I was the shit. I even had a dumb ass walk that I would do every time I put them on.  If that isn't some kind of fashion nightmare for the ages, I don't know what is.  Okay your turn, what fashion trend did you give into that you now regret?

32 comments:

T. R Xands said...

*sigh* My jheri curl.

Just let your sooooooul gloooow!

Renee said...

T.RXands...damn that cracked me up. I can honestly say I skipped the jheri curl but there are people still rocking it today

T. R Xands said...

Yeah, the scariest thing about my jheri curl is that I rocked it into the early 2000's. Obviously there were no mirrors, clocks, or calendars in my house!

Danny said...

While I am proud to say that I was one of the ones that had foresight not to do it, there were a few kids in my class that took up the whole wearing your clothes backwards Kriss Kross style. But since the ones that did were the "in crowd" no one laughed at them.

Renee said...

Danny you're cheating you didn't reveal a shame. Don't tell me you don't have a high top fade in your past.

offourpedestals said...

Neon.

Neon what?

Neon EVERYTHING. Socks, tights, shirts, skirts, hair clips, purses--I was a walking Day-Glo nightmare, sneering at my friends who didn't get it. Of course, in hindsight, it's amazing I had any friends in the first place. And that my fiery ensembles didn't BLIND them all.

Scott said...

Yep, I permed my hair on a regular basis in the mid 80's. I also sported a mullet from time to time. Anyone else shame themselves wearing mesh shoes? I went white water rafting and I wore these on the first day. At the end of the day when i took my shoes off I noticed what I though were chicken pox or so something, when what it really was was sunburn. The Sun used those damn mesh shoes as lazer beams and spotted me up!

Ok thats 3 shames....I'm done!

Renee said...

@Scott

Now that you have admitted to the perm you know I want to see pictures right. I am sure you were still handsome though honey LOL...I didn't even know about the mullet though, that is right up there with the hammer pants, looks like we belong together. LOVE YOU.

Renee said...

@offourpedestals sounds like you were a walking wham video...don't feel bad I remember pitching a fit because my mom wouldn't buy me one of those ugly wide neon belts all the kids were wearing...she didn't see the point in a belt that had no purpose other than to glow in the dark.

Anonymous said...

Why should people feel ashamed for having done things that they really enjoyed and that hurt no one -- I just don't get it!

Renee said...

@anon

It's not really about feeling ashamed.It's about having fun with the weird intricacies that make each one of us unique.

On the last few I admitted to loving little shop of horrors, watching the family guy, and liking that song I am so sexy by right said Fred. Of course none of that is something to be ashamed of it is just part of being quirky little ol me.

Danny said...

No I didn't have a high top fade (but my older brother had one that gave Kid's a run for its money) but I did have designs cut into my hair pretty often. Lighting bolts, the Nike logo, etc...

There wasn't a lot of money to go around to copy the popular clothing styles when I was a kid but hairstyles were easy (and cheap) to copy.

randombabble.com said...

Really. Big. Clothes.

Huge. I would get clothes that were XXXL (in men's, I was a thirteen year old girl)..and I probably was about a medium in women's at the time.

Overalls, w/ the strap hanging loose, and if they were the short kind, leggings under them (although, I hear leggings are back?) and a couple of pairs of "scrunch" socks, mis matched and layered.

I was so cool, and not even one of the cool kids. HA! Of course, most of it was from a thrift store, hand me downs, or swiped and modified from my mom's closet...

Also, for my whole seventh grade year, I was sporting an asymmetrical haircut. It was really short on one side (above my ears), and circled around my head until it was just under my chin on the other. I really wish I had pictures to prove it. Lol!

Anonymous said...

Stirrup pants! Pink stirrup pants with an oversized purple sweatshirt.

Sandalstraps said...

OK, there's a lot of bad fashion being confessed here, so I have to make my confession:

I had a mullet.

And not just in the 80's.

Mine finally died in 1996.

(Hanging head and walking away slowly.)

White Trash Academic said...

I did the neon thing too.

I also remember an outfit I had with paint splashes all over it? I am sure i thought it was the coolest thing in 1985.

But, the worst fasion decision, and one I have to be reminded of everything I look at old pictures, was the 2 year period I wore a baseball cap sideways...I don't think I ever took that thing off...and I'm a girl.

I have no idea why I thought it was so cool but I know it was not because I didn't want to fix my hair. I was in the grades 5 and 6 so I wasn't into make-up and hair yet.

Rebecca said...

Cowboy shoes.

victoria said...

Long, permed hair with big, pouffy, teased-out bangs. really big. and I grew out my rockin' asymmetrical haircut in order to do it.

Stentor said...

I continued to wear sweatshirts with applique dinosaurs on them through most of elementary school (plus big, plastic-framed glasses). And I did the grunge-era flannel shirt thing after the grunge era was on its way out.

theunmarrieddaughter said...

bows. Ribbon bows tied on my oxford shirts. Oh, how I loved my ribbon bows.

Queers United said...

None that I regret but back in highschool I was bored and painted my nails black pretending to be goth. I failed miserably lol.

julie said...

I never really followed fashion. I preferred to make fashion. I have actually created clothing and sold clothing.

Renee, can you please make a post on men's issues just as a humanist. I want to put some things forward and I want to hear from others.

Canada is a leading country on human rights through feminists. I can't find men's rights on the Canadian Human Rights site but I know 100% that New Zealand Human Rights travel to Canada and discusses this with them. In fact we follow you. Also, NZ has already made men's right a human right. But I can't understand why Canada has not moved forward this way.

I am a person that goes for the underdog. That's just me and men's rights is the knew underdog. Do you think we can talk about this? I am sure others will give decent imput if the post is put right.

Afterall you are a humanist. (smile)

I am very sincere.

Angel H. said...

Stirrup pants, oversized sweatshirts, and mousse.

Lots and lots of mousse.

Renee said...

What exactly is that you feel I am avoiding Julie? No men are not the underdog. Patriarchy is real and males still live with unearned privileges. I have written about specific instances of injustice as I come across them, but if you expect me to advocate that men as a group are being attacked, I won't because I don't believe that.

Kim said...

I got mono in high school and I felt real crappy all the time, so I took to wearing pajama pants to school and just about everywhere else I went. I'm very embarrassed, looking back on it, but at least I made it through high school without having to repeat a semester.

julie said...

Renee, we are not from then same country yet we follow the same ideology.

New Zealand was the first country in the world to give women the vote. Men were allowed the vote because it was a global movement but questioned this and insisted women get the vote the next election. So women got the vote 3 years after men.

Women in the Pacific are known to run the house. They are head of the house. Yet, they follow the idea that women are oppressed.

Women in NZ also started the movement for nurses caring for babies through the hard work of a male doctor.

But women were not doctors and that is where the fight for women's health came from.

You are following an indoctrination that women are less than men when women have fought hard to make women gain major things in health and care for battered women and their say.

People think we are behind but we are in front.

We stopped some major experiments on women but now we go backwards because women overseas are not going forward.

julie said...

Also, our men are suffering from the idea that women are oppressed. But that is not my say. Some of the biggest feminists understand this.

The left does not care for they are a global movement. Yet, NZ is much more open. Our men matter to us.

Can't we get a global idea from women? That is all I ask. Maybe the rest of the world thinks men are useless. But we don't.

Arum said...

Hahaha - Jesus, Mary and Joseph, there are so many I don't know where to start! I was a Goth for quite a while, thought I looked fab.

What about my Toyah Wilcox hairstyle? It was a bright orange pudding basin, which went up over my eyes, then down over my nose in a point. I looked like a belisha beacon. Then there was the one which was short, straight layers at the back and frizzy curls on the top. I looked like a Bedlington Terrier's bum. We won't even mention the blue mohican.

My batwing polo neck? My stripey socks with multi-coloured toes? Ladies and gentlemen, the ra-ra skirt. I think I win this one!

Arum said...

Julie, I think you're a little stary-eyed about your country.

Firstly, saying women rule in the house is fine - but laws aren't made in the house. Housework isn't paid. Are 50% of your members of parliament women? What about your judiciary - how many high court judges are women? What about your Law Lords, or equivalent? How many of your top 100 companies are headed by women, or even have women on the board?

As for domestic violence, ask a Moari woman about the horrific levels of DV in her community. Don't you have any African immigrants to NZ, so female genital mutilation isn't a problem? What about forced marriage and honour killings in your Asian communities? You can't have a 'global' view if you ignore the different communities in your own country.

DV is an issue everywhere. You can't hold up the existance of refuges as an example of how the problem is all cleared up. If you need refuges, the DV is still a big problem.

What about rape? What is the conviction rate in rape cases in NZ? In the UK, it's less than 5%.

Just because men 'gave' you the vote doesn't mean that women are now 'in front'!

Of course we care about men - for example, I worry that pornography is warping and restricting male sexuality. I believe that men are severely restricted by current gender norms into shadows of what they could be. However, this blog is called 'Womanist Musings', and therefore concentrates on issues that particularly affect women.

nia said...

Leg warmers in the searing Caribbean heat.
And I did the really big clothes thing too!

julie said...

Hi Arum, I am not at all stary eyed about New Zealand. I am very aware of what goes on for the Maori and in DV.

In the 1980's women's refuges would organise a meeting for the woman and the man to discuss what happened for the event of DV to occur. Now under policy women in the refuges can't allow the woman to see her partner else the children are taken off her. Of course the refuges don't always do this.

I can tell the most horrific stories that women have been through regarding DV but I can also say that things have changed.

You know, sometimes gays and lesbians who move into the country ask the GLBT site where they can go out. The people on the site say, "Anywhere". This is because NZ doesn't care. But of course there are things that are unfair to them like having to see writing on walls calling them names. This is mostly from lack of understanding.

Arum, sooner or later we are going to need to have a masculism. We live in a world where information makes our decisions.

I can also tell you stories about men that are horrific.

........

As for having 50% women in government positions ... well, it is a big responsibility. I am not sure how many women want it. But we are hoping for it to happen by 2010 as our labour goals have planned. No-one is questioning it but I do know women in the HRC are wondering how to achieve it. I am just wondering if we will put women in who are not capable just to get the numbers.

But I understand what Renee's site is about. I think I need to get away from all this for a while for my sanity. And my heart. (smile)

julie said...

Excuse me Arum, but I have given the wrong year for 50% of politicians in NZ being female. It is for the next election in 2012.