Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Thunder Bay & Lessons Not Learned from Residential Schools

Canada’s now defunct residential school system will go down in history as one of our grossest violations of human rights and dignity. On July 11, 2008 Prime Minister Stephen Harper issued a public apology to our Indigenous citizens saying:

“The treatment of children in Indian residential schools is a sad chapter in our history. The government now recognizes that the consequences of the Indian residential schools policy were profoundly negative and that this policy has had a lasting and damaging impact on aboriginal culture, heritage and language,”

With the apology and the payment of reparations, many Canadians consider racism against our First Nations citizens a closed chapter in our history books, thus denying that our Indigenous citizens continue to face racism on a daily basis. Their culture is often constructed under the banner of the “noble savage” or the “long suffering sqaw.”

It is quite common to hear Natives spoken of as though they exist with systemic privileges that are not possible within a racist white supremacist state. Not paying taxes or having the ability to cross the border at will does not compensate for the near destruction of a people, rape, theft of land, murder and poverty. Despite these so-called privileges, very few would be willing to give up the advantages that come with whiteness to trade places with the average Indigenous person in North America.

In the supposed act of civilizing Indigenous Peoples, one of the first crimes committed against them was the cutting of their hair. Though not all tribes had long flowing hair, reflecting European beauty standards was/is often understood as accepting assimilation as the proper goal of all people of color. Some First Nation tribes wore Mohicans or what is known as Mohawks, forelocks, scalplocks, squash blossoms, butterfly whorls, and chongos. Hair played/plays a significant role in their culture and is often not cut unless they are in mourning. To cut the hair of an Indigenous person without permission is a violation of their cultural norms and is seen by many as a humiliation.

Finish Reading At Global Comment

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