Friday, September 2, 2011

Do You Agree With Dr. Maya Angelou About the MLK Memorial?


'My Heroes - Maya Angelou connected with countless people through her powerful poetry' photo (c) 2009, Adria Richards - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/
 

Maya Angelou will be remembered as one of the most profound women of our time.  Over the years she has shared many sage wisdom's that absolutely resonate with the soul. When someone with such an awesome track record speaks, I found that it is always wise to listen.

As many of you are already aware, the official dedication of the Matin Luther King Memorial was postponed due to hurricane Irene, however the monument on The National Mall is open for visitors.

Originally the memorial was intended to have the following quote:
“If you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice. Say that I was a drum major for peace. I was a drum major for righteousness. And all of the other shallow things will not matter.”
 Due to a change in the design plans the quote was turned into a paraphrase and it now reads:
I was a drum major for justice, peace and righteousness.
Speaking to the Washington Post, Dr. Angelou had some choice words to say about the changes.

“The quote makes Dr. Martin Luther King look like an arrogant twit,” Angelou, 83, said Tuesday. “He was anything but that. He was far too profound a man for that four-letter word to apply.

“He had no arrogance at all,” she said. “He had a humility that comes from deep inside. The ‘if’ clause that is left out is salient. Leaving it out changes the meaning completely.”

The paraphrase “minimizes the man,” she said. “It makes him seem less than the humanitarian he was. . . . It makes him seem an egotist.”

The drum major reference “wasn’t all that he was,” she said. “He would never have said that of himself. He said ‘you’ might say it.”

She said the quote should be changed to put it in context.
Told the quote had to be paraphrased to fit the available space, she replied: “Too bad.”
Do you agree with Dr. Angelou and can a man like Dr. King ever be sufficiently memorialized?